Download e-book for kindle: A Companion to Horace by Gregson Davis

By Gregson Davis

ISBN-10: 140515540X

ISBN-13: 9781405155403

ISBN-10: 1444319191

ISBN-13: 9781444319194

A better half to Horace contains a number of commissioned interpretive essays through top students within the box of Latin literature protecting the total everyday diversity of works produced through Horace.

  • positive factors unique essays through quite a lot of major literary students
  • Exceeds expectancies for a standard instruction manual by way of that includes essays that problem, instead of simply summarize, traditional perspectives of Homer's paintings and impression
  • Considers Horace’s debt to his Greek predecessors
  • Treats the reception of Horace from modern theoretical views
  • bargains updated info and illustrations at the archaeological website normally pointed out as Horace's villa within the Sabine geographical region

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Extra info for A Companion to Horace

Example text

Where Horace is testing the reader’s credulity is in saying immediately about his father: nec timuit, sibi ne vitio quis verteret, olim si praeco parvas, aut ut fuit ipse, coactor mercedes sequerem: neque ego essem questus: at hoc nunc laus illi debetur et a me gratia maior. He was never afraid it would be a reproach to him if as auctioneer or, as he was, auction broker, I piled up small gains: nor would I complain: as things are, I owe him praise and gratitude all the more. These lines suggest that Horace’s father, by pushing him ahead in society, enabled him to attain the rank of Roman eques, with several times the necessary fortune.

One of the fashionable teachers we know he hired for Horace was from south Italy, not far from Venosa, Orbilius of Beneventum, now Benevento, who taught Horace the early Latin poets (Horace mentions Livius Andronicus) and was famous for inflicting beatings on his students. Orbilius was remembered affectionately by them, as were many brutal Victorian schoolmasters by their aristocratic students (like John Keate, DD, 1773–1832, headmaster of Eton, who was adored by his students throughout their later life though he once flogged eighty of them in one day).

Orbilius was remembered affectionately by them, as were many brutal Victorian schoolmasters by their aristocratic students (like John Keate, DD, 1773–1832, headmaster of Eton, who was adored by his students throughout their later life though he once flogged eighty of them in one day). Such parallels with the plagosus Orbilius are often mentioned in Horace commentaries of the nineteenth century, but they do not often enough draw the obvious conclusion that Horace was being educated among schoolmates of the two higher ranks in the Republic, in order to push himself as high in rank as he could be made to go.

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A Companion to Horace by Gregson Davis


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